Earl Crew, M.S.

Biography

Earl Charles “Chuck” Crew, M.S., is a doctoral candidate in Clinical and Health Psychology at the University of Florida. Chuck was born and raised in Alaska and received his B.A. in Psychology from the University of Alaska Anchorage in 2010. CrewAfter graduation, he trained as a sleep research technologist through the William C. Dement Sleep and Chronobiology Summer Fellowship at Brown University. Chuck then followed up this experience with appointments as a Research Associate at the University of Pittsburgh and Research Coordinator at the University of North Texas investigating the effects of poor or inadequate sleep on short- and long-term health outcomes. He is a current student in the Medical/Health Psychology track in the Department of Clinical and Health Psychology and a Graduate Fellow at the Center for Pain Research and Behavioral Health under the mentorship of Dr. Michael Robinson. Apart from his studies, Chuck’s hobbies include exploring the beaches and state parks of Florida, participating in campus and community recreational sports (especially roller hockey and softball), watching movies, collecting vinyl records, and rooting for the Gators.

Research Focus

Chuck’s primary research interests are in the prevalence, correlates, and treatment of clinical sleep disorders in medical populations. Specifically, Chuck is interested in (a) factors which influence the development of sleep complaints in chronic medical populations (e.g., cardiovascular disease, chronic pain, neurodegenerative diseases), (b) how chronic sleep disturbances (i.e., insomnia) affect the course and treatment of these medical conditions, and (c) the effect of cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTi) combined with other disease-specific therapies as a treatment for sleep disturbance and other neurobehavioral correlates in these patients. Chuck’s master’s thesis looked at the relationships between symptoms of insomnia and neurocognitive functioning in cardiac patients undergoing implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy. For his dissertation, Chuck plans to use intensive daily diary monitoring to understand how insomnia in patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease affects other non-motor symptoms (specifically pain, mood, and cognitive functioning).

Clinical Focus

 Chuck serves as a student clinician and peer-supervisor for patients with insomnia or other behavioral sleep disorders treated through the Insomnia and Behavioral Sleep Medicine Clinic at the UF Health/Shands Sleep Disorders Center. Additionally, he enjoys providing psychotherapy services to older adults struggling with comorbid medical and/or psychological conditions seen through the UF Psychology Clinic. Chuck is also interested in providing care to underserved populations, and recently started volunteering through the UF College of Medicine’s Equal Access Clinic Network (EACN) to assist with psychological consultations at the weekly EACN Primary Care Clinic @ Main Street and in providing therapy services at Free Therapy Night.

Peer Reviewed Manuscripts

McCrae, C. S., Roth, A. J., Ford, J., Crew, E.C., Conti, J. B., Berry, R. B., Sears, S. F. (2016). Sleep, psychosocial functioning, and device-specific adjustment in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). Behavioral Sleep Medicine, 14(1), 49-66.

Mundt, J. M., Crew, E. C., Krietsch, K., Roth, A., Vatthauer, K., Robinson, M. E., Staud, R., Berry, R. B., & McCrae, C. S. (In-press). Measuring treatment outcomes in comorbid insomnia and fibromyalgia: Concordance of subjective and objective assessments. Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.

Lampman, C., Crew, E. C., Lowery, S., Tompkins, K., & Mulder, M. (In-press). Women faculty distressed: Descriptions and consequences of academic contrapower harassment. NASPA Journal about Women in Higher Education.

Under Review:

 McCrae, C. S., Crew, E. C., Roth, A. J., Dzierzewski, J. M., Conti, J. B., Berry, R. B., & Sears, S. F. (In-submission). Shock anxiety and depression predict sleep variability in patients with ICDs.

Published Abstracts

Crew, E. C., Catania, C., Anderson, L., Robinson, M. E., & Price, C.E. (In-press). Sleep in non-demented patients with Parkinson’s disease: Shorter sleep durations predict increased burden in their caregivers. Sleep, 38(Abstract Suppl.).

Crew, E. C., Asken, B. M., Sullan, M. J., Clugston, J. R., & Bauer, R. M. (2016). Acute sleep changes following sport-related concussion are associated with increased intra-individual cognitive variability on the ImPACT. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 22(Suppl. 1).

Sullan, M. J., Asken, B. M., Crew, E.C., Clugston, J. R., and Bauer, R. M. (2016). The relationship between post-concussive sleep symptoms and recovery time in Division 1 collegiate athletes. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 22(Suppl. 1).

 Crew, E. C., Sears, S. F., Roth, A. J., Dzierzewski, J. M., Conti, J. B., Berry, R. B., & McCrae, C. S., (2014). Variability in the duration of nocturnal awakenings predicts task-dependent cognitive performance in cardiac patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs). Sleep, 37(Abstract Suppl.), A343.

Crew, E. C., Roth, A. J., Sears, S. F., Dzierzewski, J. M., Conti, J. B., Berry, R. B., & McCrae, C. S (2014). Shock anxiety predicts sleep onset latency and sleep quality in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs). Sleep, 37(Abstract Suppl.), A250.

Mundt., J., Crew, E.C., Krietsch, K., Roth, A., Vatthauer, K., Robinson, M. E., Staud, R., Berry, R. B., & McCrae, C. S. (2015). Measuring treatment outcomes in comorbid insomnia and fibromyalgia: Concordance of subjective and objective assessments. Sleep, 38(Abstract Suppl.), A433.

Francetich, J. M., Taylor, D. J., Moore, S., Crew, E. C., Dietch, J. R., Estevez, R., Chu, C., & Kelly, K. (2015). A comparison of actigraphy sleep onset and sleep offset settings across wake threshold settings. Sleep, 38(Abstract Suppl.), A418.

Francetich, J. M., Taylor, D. J., Kelly, K., Crew, E. C., Marczyk, K., Estevez, R., & Dietch, J. (2014). A comparison of low, medium, and high wake threshold settings for actigraphy sleep onset latency and terminal wakefulness in college students with and without insomnia. Sleep, 37(Abstract Suppl.), A99.

 Crew, E. C., Bramoweth, A. D., Roane, B. M., & Taylor, D. J. (2013). Differences in psychosocial functioning among a college sample of normal and poor sleepers with and without an insomnia complaint. Sleep, 36(Abstract Suppl.), B622.