Common Readings

Summer 2017 Book:

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

Book discussion on September 15th at 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

Amazon (New = $11, Used = $2)

Alachua County Public Library

University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries

SummaryFrom Good Reads: “Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed. Soon afterward, his death is a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gangbanger. Protesters are taking to the streets in Khalil’s name. Some cops and the local drug lord try to intimidate Starr and her family. What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr. But what Starr does or does not say could upend her community. It could also endanger her life.”

Author BiographyFrom Amazon: “Angie Thomas was born, raised, and still resides in Jackson, Mississippi as indicated by her accent. She is a former teen rapper whose greatest accomplishment was an article about her in Right-On Magazine with a picture included. She holds a BFA in Creative Writing from Belhaven University and an unofficial degree in Hip Hop. She can also still rap if needed. She is an inaugural winner of the Walter Dean Myers Grant 2015, awarded by We Need Diverse Books. Her debut novel, The Hate U Give, was acquired by Balzer + Bray/HarperCollins in a 13-house auction. Film rights have been optioned by Fox 2000 with George Tillman attached to direct and Hunger Games actress Amandla Stenberg set to star.”

Other Suggested Readings:

5 Minute Reads:

Longer Reads:

American Psychological Association Guidelines:

Video Clips:

Books:

Podcasts:

  • Code SwitchEver find yourself in a conversation about race and identity where you just get…stuck? Code Switch can help. We’re all journalists of color, and this isn’t just the work we do. It’s the lives we lead. Sometimes, we’ll make you laugh. Other times, you’ll get uncomfortable. But we’ll always be unflinchingly honest and empathetic. Come mix it up with us.

  • Good Muslim, Bad Muslim: A monthly podcast featuring Tanzila ‘Taz’ Ahmed and Zahra Noorkbakhsh about the good and the bad about the American Muslim female experience.

  • About Race: Co-discussants Anna HolmesBaratunde ThurstonRaquel Cepeda and Tanner Colby host a lively multiracial, interracial conversation about the ways we can’t talk, don’t talk, would rather not talk, but intermittently, fitfully, embarrassingly do talk about culture, identity, politics, power, and privilege in our pre-post-yet-still-very-racial America.

  • Latino USA: Listen on SoundCloudiTunes or Stitcher for Latino-focused episodes ranging from current events like Donald Trump kicking Jorge Ramos out of his press conference, “anchor babies” and Mexico’s drug war to evergreen cultural pieces spotlighting music and artists from Latin America or, of course, the Latino USA.

  • Still Processing: This podcast from The New York Times is hosted by Wesley Morris and Jenna Wortham. They cover all your pop culture favorites, from RuPaul to Girls to Beyoncé. You’ll laugh, you’ll learn, and if that lineup of topics doesn’t sell you on the show, Morris and Wortham’s fun, natural banter will.

  • The Bodcast: The first season of the show by Bustle focused primarily on size and how it intersects with race and gender. This second season, they’re asking questions that push the body positive conversation beyond size. Check out “The Bodcast” on ACast and iTunes.

  • Intersection: This podcast is from The New Republic, hosted by Jamil Smith. The podcast is centered on race, but always explores the intersectionality of racial identity with other social systems such as gender, sexual orientation, body image and beauty standards, economic issues, etc. Often featuring interviews with various experts, researchers, journalists, and real everyday people, Intersection is a really important look at the way racial identity fits into a much larger social landscape.

  • Another Round: Two hilarious (and occasionally drunk) women talk about everything from current events to workplace racism to squirrels in this BuzzFeed podcast.

Recent Movies: