DSM-5 Workshop

Understanding the DSM-5:

Problems and Prospects in the Process of Diagnostic Revisions

Friday, October 11, 2013

DeWeese Auditorium, McKnight Brain Institute

9:00AM-4:00PM

 

SEATING IS LIMITED SO PLEASE REGISTER AS SOON AS POSSIBLE

CHP STUDENTS, INTERNS, & FACULTY MUST REGISTER BUT THERE IS NO CHARGE

OUTSIDE PROFESSIONALS: $100

WE WILL AWARD 6 HOURS OF CE (Psychology)

REGISTER HERE

DSM-5

Description

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) has undergone substantial revision across its sixty years of evolution, with the latest version (DSM-5) continuing that tradition in substantial ways. The discontinuation of the multi-axial system, the addition and deletion of specific disorders, the regrouping and reclassification of familiar disorders, and significant changes in the names, nature and criteria associated with various disorders all mark the fifth edition of the DSM as a substantial, and controversial, revision of the diagnostic system. The movement towards dimensionalizing disorders, the introduction of cross-cutting diagnostic dimensions, and the expansion of several areas of disorders (e.g., Substance and Other Addictive Disorders, Depressive Disorders, Traumatic and Stress-Related Disorders and Obsessive Compulsive and Other Related Disorders) mark the latest revision of the DSM as among the most radical revisions in the manuals history. These and many other changes are described and discussed in this workshop, which details the changes and novel features of the DSM-5 and emphasizes aspects that enhance its clinical utility.

Learning Objectives

Participants will be able to:

  1. Identify at least ten (10) key changes in the DSM-5 with the goal of improved utilization of new concepts for better diagnosis with challenging symptom presentations.
  2. Describe the significant conceptual changes associated with the revisions in the manual relative to recent advances in theories of psychopathology.
  3. Discuss at least three significant controversies generated by the most recent revision of the DSM that should be monitored as they play out in the research toward resolution and theoretical refinement that will hopefully advance our field.

About the Presenter

Dr. Greg J. Neimeyer is professor of psychology in the department of Psychology at the University of Florida, where he teaches the doctoral course on the DSM and has served both as Director of Clinical Training and as Graduate Coordinator.  A Fellow of the American Psychological Association, he is also a recipient of its Award for Outstanding Contributions to Career and Personality Research.  Dr. Neimeyer was invited by the American Psychiatric Association to complete its “Train-the-Trainers” institute on the DSM-5, by the American Psychological Association to write a review of the DSM-5 for its review journal, PsyCritiques, and by the National Psychologist to review “An Intelligent Clinician’s Guide to the DSM-5.”

A former Chair of the Executive Board of the Council of Counseling Psychologists in the United States, Dr. Neimeyer has also been elected as a Fellow to the Academy of Distinguished Teaching Scholars.  His current research focuses on aspects of professional development and competence. He divides his time between the University of Florida and Washington, D.C., where he directs the Office of Continuing Education in Psychology at the American Psychological Association.