Lisa Nackers, M.S., M.P.H., 2012 Dissertation of the Year Award – Society of Behavioral Medicine

Published: April 20th, 2012

Category: Recent News, Students

Lisa Nackers is a graduate student in CHP currently on internship at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, IL.  Her research and training are primarily focused in the area of health psychology, specifically weight management.  The Society of Behavioral Medicine (SBM) Dissertation Award is an annual competition to recognize excellence in a student’s research.  Lisa received this award for her dissertation entitled “Improving lifestyle interventions for obesity: the effects of prescribing moderate versus mild caloric restriction goals on long-term weight loss maintenance.”  Lisa has worked in the UF Weight Management lab under the mentorship of Dr. Michael Perri.

Abstract

Improving lifestyle interventions for obesity: the effects of prescribing moderate versus mild caloric restriction goals on long-term weight loss maintenane

Lisa M. Nackers, Kathryn M. Ross, Pamela J. Dubyak, Patricia E. Durning, Kristina M. von Castel-Roberts, Michael J. Daniels, Stephen D. Anton, & Michael G. Perri

Controversy exists regarding whether a fast or slow initial weight loss results in greater long-term weight reduction.  This study examined the effects of prescribing moderate versus mild caloric restriction goals on weight loss within a six-month lifestyle intervention followed by six months of extended-care.  Participants included 125 obese women (mean BMI = 37.9 + 3.9 kg/m2; mean age = 52.0 + 10.8 yrs) who were randomly assigned either a 1,000 or 1,500 kcal/day goal so as to induce either a fast or slow weight loss, respectively.  Participants prescribed the 1,000 kcal/day goal lost more weight at Month 6 compared to those prescribed the 1,500 kcal/day goal (-10.8 + 6.8 kg versus -6.3 + 6.8 kg, respectively, p = .045).  From Months 6 – 12, the 1,000 kcal/day condition experienced a significant weight regain so that weight change at Month 12 was not significantly different between the 1,000 and 1,500 kcal/day conditions (-8.8 + 8.4 kg versus -5.7 + 8.4 kg, respectively, p = .227); however, 61% of 1,000 kcal/day participants compared to 42% of 1,500 kcal/day participants achieved a weight loss > 5% at Month 12, p = .04.  Treatment condition moderated the association between baseline caloric intake and weight regain.  Participants reporting higher baseline caloric intake who were assigned the 1,000 kcal/day goal regained more weight from Months 6 – 12 than those consuming higher baseline calories who were assigned the 1,500 kcal/day goal, p = .016.  Findings suggest that prescribing a 1,000 rather than 1,500 kcal/day goal increases the likelihood of achieving a 5% weight reduction long-term; however, larger caloric restriction may increase susceptibility to weight regain, especially for participants consuming greater amounts of baseline calories.